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would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground, crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek
encouraging news on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selefti dveault" thanks d to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no deal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for t
have been gathering to make flowers and teddy bears. it is a focus of this community's greece. my colleague is up outside sandy hook elementary school with us now. that memorial, i visited yesterday morning and this evening. it is really extraordinary have people have wanted to come there to express their sadness about what happened. >> people are coming here now. they're coming to lay flowers. there are christmas trees here. there are trees for all of the children who were killed and he will not say christmas day. this one is focused on avielle richman. she loved to ride horses. she loved to color her "harry potter"coloring book. these trees are california grown. she had recently moved here from the other side of the country. you can see that people are coming to light candles. they're coming to lay flowers. they are also coming most poignantly with teddy bears. every tree has a group of soft toys for the departed child. this really is a most agonizing week. two funerals took place together. there are many more to come. >> laura, i saw earlier a crossed that had come all the way
! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren't you home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting f
a cliff, not greece, but lower growth on a sustained beats, you are talking about when you get up debt there, it can hold back your growth for decades there are other things you can do to make up for it, you can have innovation and other improvements but it is definitely problematic. you know, you start getting up at levels twice where we are, then i think it gets really dangerous, nobody knows where inbetween you really fall off a cliff. i thigh it is hyperbole to say that the united states is going to become greece but it is not hyperbole to compare us to japan and wonder if we get stuck in this slow growth quagmire. europe might be even more in danger of that. >> rose: okay. let's stop right there. do you think that we are at risk of getting stuck in the slow growth quagmire that japan got stuck in, the united states economy? >> well, i would say we are in a mild version of it now, and, you know, we need to do improvements and reforms. i don't think spending money is the solution. there are smart ways to spend it for sure, but i don't buy this idea that bigger keynesian stimulus wi
egypt, turkey, greece, and palestine, where jesus was born in the jewish land of dea, then rul b hy ng.kierod >> in judea, the king, herod, was in effect a client king. he ruled almost in place of rome. he was the... he was the voice of rome, the instrument of rome, probably "instrument of rome" is best in that, because he... he had his own independent notions certainly. >> herod the great was probably one of the greatest kings of the post-biblical period in israel, but you wouldn't want your daughter to date him. he was ambitious, brutal, extremely successful. >> and it is one of the real untold ironies of jewish history that this man, who... who's the guy you love to hate in jewish history, really, leaves the most indelible mark on the face of the land of israel. >> it appears that herod thought of jerusalem as his showpiece. he really wanted to make it a place where people would come, just as people would have gone to athens, or rome, or the great cities of the mediterranean world. >> narrator: a meticulously accurate model of ancient jerusalem shows the extraordinary scale of herod
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6